MaverickMagazine

Aesthetics

MaverickMagazine is not a site for posting poetry. MaverickMagazine is a magazine with the highest artistic standards and a toothy editorial staff dedicated to the discovery and display of those most rare and vital poems: those which resonate soundly with the rich, original and visionary imagery, language and content that is the MaverickMagazine impulse; the best and most important vein of the American poetic tradition. (See our Loose Canon)

MaverickMagazine seeks to place strong, cutting-edge work by emerging writers together with new work by established writers to create the first high-quality digital forum for the very best contemporary poetry.

Maverick believes more in maverick art than in maverick artists. More in maverick poems than in maverick poets. That is, Maverick believes in the maverick impulse. The impulse that draws one away from the herd and leads to a new, independent, original stand. Such impulse is virtually insustainable in the main, and thus, even in those artists who devote their entire lives to relentlessly courting their respective muses, truly maverick moments are the exception, not the rule. The poet Robert Lowell felt that writers were lucky if, in the course of their lives, they'd written one truly great and memorable stanza, or a few great and memorable lines, much less an entire poem. To say nothing of an entire opus. Maverick is dedicated to the discovery and display of those most rare and vital moments, those poems that resonate soundly with the rich, original and visionary imagery, language and content that is the maverick impulse; the best and most important vein of the American poetic tradition.

MaverickMagazine's basic aesthetic principles are largely informed by the precepts of Modernism as delineated by Ezra Pound: The language of poetry "must be a fine language, departing in no way from speech, save by a heightened intensity (i.e. simplicity). There must be no book words, no periphrase, no inversions... nothing--nothing that you couldn't, in some circumstance, in the stress of some emotion, actually say."

To this, we add the three principles Pound set forth in his essay "A Few Don'ts for an Imagist."

    1) Direct treatment of the "thing," whether subjective or objective
    2) To use absolutely no word that does not contribute to the presentation
    3) Compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, NOT of the metronome

MaverickMagazine takes these principles a step further by placing considerable importance on:

1) Voice: The voice of a poem should be strong, clear, original and uniform, both within a single poem, and from poem to poem within a poet's opus.

2) Content: Content should be pertinent to the human condition.

3) Time: A union should occur, a fusion between the present moment and some moment in the past or future. The reader should be able to straddle two separate moments; to touch the past and/or future in terms of the present, or vice versa.